Felisa A. Smith
Department of Biology, University of New Mexico

1. MOM v4.1.

Global database of late Quaternary mammal body mass arranged by continent.

This is an updated version of the data originally assembled for: Smith, F.A., J.H. Brown, J.P. Haskell, J. Alroy, E.L. Charnov, T. Dayan, B.J. Enquist, S.K.M. Ernest, E.A. Hadly, D. Jablonski, K.E. Jones, D.M. Kaufman, S.K. Lyons, P. Marquet, B.A. Maurer, K. Niklas, W. Porter, K. Roy, B. Tiffney and M.R. Willig. 2004. Similarity of mammalian body size across the taxonomic hierarchy and across space and time. American Naturalist 163:672-691.

Metadata are available here and at Ecology Archives (http://www.esapubs.org/archive/ecol/E084/094/) Please read these as they will describe how data were obtained and how they can be used and interpreted. Body mass, for example, represents a geographic average across genders, and hence should not be used for specific localities.

If you use these data please cite as: Smith, F.A., S.K. Lyons, S.K.M. Ernest, K.E. Jones, D.M. Kaufman, T. Dayan, P.A. Marquet, J.H. Brown and J.P. Haskell. 2003. Body mass of late Quaternary mammals. Ecology 84:3402 (updated version obtained from senior author).


2. MAMMOTH v2.0.

Global database of maximum body mass of each mammalian order for each sub epoch of the Cenozoic arranged by continent.

This is an updated version of the data originally assembled for: Smith, F.A., A.G. Boyer, J.H. Brown, D.P. Costa, T. Dyan, S.K.M. Ernest, A.R. Evans, M. Fortelius, J.L. Gittleman, M.J. Hamilton, L.E. Harding, K. Lintulaakso, S.K. Lyons, C. McCain, J.K. Okie, J.J. Saarinen, R.M. Sibly, P.R. Stephens, J. Theodor and M. Uhen. 2010. The evolution of maximum body size of terrestrial mammals. Science 330:1216-1219 + online supplement.online supplement.

If you use these data please cite as: Smith et al. 2010. Science 330:1216-1219.