WORKSHOP & FIELD TRIPS

Cost of the Neotoma Database Workshop on Saturday is $30, which will cover sack lunches and coffee breaks

 

Costs for Tuesday Fieldtrips #1-3 on Tuesday are $60/person, including transportation and sack lunches.

 

Costs for Friday's afternoon Fieldtrip #4 is $45/person, and does not include sack lunches.

 

NEOTOMA/TILIA/BACON DATABASE WORKSHOP: Saturday, July 2, 2016, 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

This hands-on informatics workshop will be held at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, so participants will need to travel from Santa Fe to Albuquerque on Friday afternoon/evening. Workshop participants that sign up for Fieldtrip #4 to the NM Museum of Natural History on Friday afternoon can simply book a hotel room a nearby in Old Town Albuquerque that evening (many restaurants within easy walking distance), and catch a cab to the University campus on Saturday morning. Out-of-towners participating in the workshop can book flights out of Albuquerque Saturday night or Sunday morning.

 

Neotoma Software EcosystemNeotoma is an NSF-funded, community-led database that has become the standard repository for paleoecological data in North America and, increasingly, globally. Its cyberinfrastructure supports global change research at the intersection between geology and ecology by enabling study of species diversity, distributions, and dynamics during the large environmental changes of the last 5 million years. By consolidating many disparate paleoecological data into one centralized repository, Neotoma lowers costs of community-wide paleodata management while offering paleoecologists a high-quality, curated data repository suitable for a wide variety of paleodata. For data users, Neotoma provides a well-structured, open-access, and easy-to-use source of paleoecological data, thereby enabling large-scale synthetic science, scientific transparency, and reproducibility. Neotoma's distributed scientific governance allows Neotoma to scale as new data types are added to it. The program Tilia is widely used for managing paleodata and for making stratigraphic diagrams. Tilia has been significantly updated to interact directly with Neotoma for uploading and downloading data. Tilia also has tools for calibrating radiocarbon dates and facilitating the building of Bacon age models. Bacon is a program that uses Bayesian statistics to produce stratigraphic age models that provide error estimates of interpolated ages.

 

Topics covered in the workshop will be:

  • Neotoma website tools for discovering, visualizing, and acquiring data
  • Tilia tools for discovering and acquiring data directly from Neotoma
  • Use of Tilia for managing, analyzing, and graphing stratigraphic data
  • Calibration of radiocarbon dates from Tilia using OxCal web services
  • Producing Bacon input files from Tilia, producing an age models with Bacon, and importing results into Tilia

Participants should bring their own laptops. Instructions will be sent in advance for installing software, including Tilia and R. Optionally, software may be installed at the workshop, in which case the participant must have administrative rights to install new software. Prior knowledge of R is not needed. Tilia is a Windows program, and laptops must be capable of running Windows. If the participant brings a Mac, it must be configured to run Windows either through e.g. Parallels or by booting to Windows.

 

For detailed information on the workshop, contact Eric Grimm (grimm@museum.state.il.us) or Jack Williams (jwwilliams1@wisc.edu).

 

 

FIELDTRIP 1: TUESDAY, June 28, 2016, 7:00am-5:00pm

 

 

VALLES CALDERA: MAGMATIC/GEOTHERMAL HISTORY,

NEOTECTONICS/LANDSCAPE EVOLUTION, AND PALEOHYDROLOGY

 

VALLES CALDERA MAGMATIC GEOTHERMAL HISTORY

 

This trip examines the Quaternary caldera magmatism and resurgence of the Valles super volcano(s) that erupted ~800 km3 of rhyolite ash flow tuffs at 1.6 and 1.25 Ma, had ring-fracture rhyolite eruptions as young as 40-60 ka, and has ongoing geothermal and hot springs activity. Drilling and analysis of lake sediments in the caldera provide a paleoclimatic record of Late Pleistocene megadroughts in the Southwestern U.S., and we will visit the drill site. The trip will visit also visit travertine deposits from hot and cool springs on the flanks of the Jemez Mts. and discuss the record they preserve of hydrochemistry of modern streams, paleohydrology, incision rates of river systems, and implications for neotectonics and landscape evolution.

 

NEOTECTONICS LANDSCAPE EVOLUTION AND PALEOHYDROLOGY

 

Top Image: Image: "Valle Grande dome" by User Brian0918 on en.wikipedia - Brian0918. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons -
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Valle_Grande_dome.jpg#/media/File:Valle_Grande_dome.jpg

Bottom Image: Hot springs travertine mound (Holocene, _7 ka; Soda Dam, Jemez River, eastern side of Rt. 4, southwest of the Valles Caldera, north of San Ysidro, northern New Mexico, USA) 1 _ F.html

 

For detailed information on the field trip, contact: Peter Fawcett (fawcett@unm.edu), Laura Crossey (lcrossey@unm.edu) or Fraser Goff (candlf@swcp.com).

 

 

 

 

FIELDTRIP 2: TUESDAY, June 28, 2016, 7am-5pm

 

FIRE ON THE MOUNTAIN: VEGETATION, FIRE, EROSION, AND

CULTURAL HISTORY IN THE JEMEZ MTS.

 

FIRE ON THE MOUNTAIN - VEGETATION, FIRE, EROSION AND CULTURAL HISTORY IN THE JEMEZ MOUNTAINS

 

This fieldtrip will highlight multiple, recent case examples of fire ecology, paleoecology, paleoclimatology, geomorphology, and archaeology of the Jemez Mountains. Tree rings, alluvial sedimentary analyses, geo-archaeology, and other approaches provide insights on the chronology and drivers of cultural and natural changes. Puebloan people occupied and intensively utilized this mountain landscape for many centuries.  Modern land uses, extreme droughts, wildfires, and post-fire erosion have resulted in stunning examples of landscape-scale ecological changes driven by complex interactions of humans and the environment. We will traverse the Jemez Mountains, ascending from the Rio Grande to the Pajarito Plateau, over the rim into the Valles Caldera, and then will descend via San Diego Canyon before looping back around to Santa Fe. Photo is of Cerro del Medio debris flow that resulted from recent post-fire erosion (Photo courtesy of Grant Meyer).

For detailed information on the fieldtrip, contact Tom Swetnam (swetnamt@email.arizona.edu) or Grant Meyer (gmeyer104@gmail.com).

 

FIELDTRIP 3. TUESDAY, June 28, 2016, 9am-5pm

 

PALEOINDIAN STUDIES AT THE HARTLEY MAMMOTH SITE AND WEST MESA

 

PALEOINDIAN STUDIES AT THE HARTLEY MAMMOTH SITE AND WEST MESAThis trip combines visits to two Paleoindian study areas, the Hartley Mammoth Site, south of Lake Abiquiu and West Mesa, west of Albuquerque. Excavations at the newly discovered Hartley Mammoth south of Lake Abiquiu in northern New Mexico are part of a larger study to test the hypothesis that Clovis hunters did not thoroughly butcher the elephants they killed, and that they were sensitive to diminishing energetic returns of meat with continued butchering labor. Hartley is part of a large study of Clovis butchering of mammoth and other elephant carcasses from ten previously excavated sites. West Mesa is a basalt-capped high terrace of the Rio Grande, with Paleoindian occupation levels (36 known sites) occurring in extensive sand sheets atop the basalt. The most recent work there is at Boca Negra Wash and Deann's Site, two Folsom sites on the margins of currently dry playas that formed wetlands during the Paleoindian period.

 

For detailed information on the fieldtrip, contact Bruce Huckell (bhuckell@unm.edu).

 

                                           

FIELDTRIP 4. FRIDAY, July 1, 2016, 1-5 pm

 

GUIDED TOUR TO NEW MEXICO MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY AND SCIENCE

 

GUIDED TOUR TO NEW MEXICO MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY AND SCIENCE

 

The Museum's permanent exhibit halls illustrate range from the birth of our Universe to the last Ice Age, with eight halls: Origins, Dawn of the Dinosaurs, Jurassic Super Giants, New Mexico's Seacoast, Age of Volcanoes, Evolving Grasslands, Cave Experience, and New Mexico's Ice Age. The tour will include both the public exhibits and a behind-the-scenes look at the research collection and labs. The Ice Age Hall has mounted skeletons of a Columbian mammoth and one of the most complete known specimens of the giant llama Camelops hesternus. The paleontology research collection contains large samples of fossil vertebrates from the Triassic, Cretaceous, Paleocene, and Late Neogene of New Mexico. We will examine collections from several well-known New Mexico Late Quaternary sites, including Sandia Cave, Slaughter Canyon Cave, Canovas Creek, and the White Mesa fissures. The tour will take 2 hours. At the end of the museum tour, participants have the option of (1) taking the van back to Santa Fe, (2) taking a cab to Albuquerque airport, or (3) checking into a hotel in nearby Old Town Albuquerque anticipating a flight out or participation in the Neotoma database workshop on Saturday morning.

 

For detailed information about the fieldtrip, contact Gary Morgan (gary.morgan1@state.nm.us).