Welcome back to an exciting Fall 2008 semester. Hope you had a restful summer break. Don't forget to register for Bio 503, there is still space available & you can register within your home department for credit!...  Register here...  SEO Grants for Fall ... You are the [an error occurred while processing this directive] person to access this page.  This page was updated on 08/19/08.
 

Courses Of Interest

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Fall 2008

Medical Imaging

591/491 ECE 510/MPHY 516-517L

Thiscourse will introduce the advanced undergraduate or graduate student to the physical principles and engineering applications of medical imaging methods. Medical imaging systems to be analyzed include conventional X-ray and computed tomography (CT), Each of these modalities will be introduced from basic physical principles to the process of image formation. Also, basic concepts in medical image
processing and analysis, as well as medical applications, will be introduced. In addition, following the lecture a lab session will be offered to acturallyoperate the medical imaging equipment and software.


Vince D. Calhoun
Phone: 272-1817
Office: ECE 224B
Location: BMSB 107 Time: Tues, 15:00-17:00pm
(some labs Wed @ 5pm)
Phil Heintz
Phone: 272-3402
Office: BMSB B05

 

Topics in Immunocomputing

591/491 Immuno-Computing Forrest TR 1230-1345 DSH 134 25

Stephanie Forrest
Department of Computer Science
Farris Engineering Building, Room 157
505-277-7104

Computer Programming Fundamentals for Non-Majors

151L Computer Programming Fundamentals for Non-Majors
lecture MF 10-1050 ME 214
lab W 9-10:50 Esc Pod 109

Melanie Moses
Assistant Professor, Computer Science
Farris Engineering Building, Rm 327
277-9140

This is a special section of CS 151, section 10, where the programming assignments will all be related to biology. This will be a hands on course, with lots of time in lab to ask questions and get comfortable with programming in Matlab. In addition to programming, we'll learn about different ways computers have changed how biologists analyze data and think about science. This is a course on programming and computation, not mathematics, and there are no math prerequisites.


Spring 2008

Genomic Analysis
M 2:30 to 5:30
Engineering Computer Classroom
Bio 444/544
Margaret Werner Washburne
Professor, Biology

Genomics and Functional Genomics are the areas of biology that developed from our ability to sequence and assemble all the DNA in an organism. It began in1988 and has been growing ever since. We deal with high throughput analyses and very large datasets and need to keep our eyes on experimental design, the underlying biology of cells and organisms, statistics, and technology development, many of which are based on classical approaches to understanding living systems - so we can ask questions better and faster. It is an area that is inherently interdisciplinary - with important interactions among biologists, statisticians, mathematicians, computer scientists, chemical engineers, and others.

Learn why genomics hasn’t led to a cure for cancer (...yet), and what is the biologists and the engineer/mathematician/statistician’s role in all of this. You will learn to read scientific papers, if you haven’t already. You will also learn how genomics can be used, not just to report on living organisms but to discover new biology. Hopefully, it will allow you to develop your interdisciplinary skills though significant communication between biology and engineering students.

This class is really the most fun for students who are thinking of or interested in the possibility of research in their futures or who feel that their future careers will require an understanding of genomics and how it can be used to understand many different, important biological problems; and, of course, how amazing it is! It is a class that will likely have you thinking in a new way.

 

Speciation Biology
T R 11:00 to 12:15
Rm. TBA
Vaishali Katju
Assistant Professor, Biology

I will be offering a course on Speciation this coming Spring 2008.  The course will be a review of the literature on the origin of species beginning with Darwin and continuing through temporary work. The course aims to provide an overview of several major topics in speciation with special emphasis on the genetics of speciation.  This is a 3-credit course with biweekly meetings on Tuesday and Thursday from 11am-12:15 pm.  Graduate students should enroll in Biology 502 (section 009).

I am hoping to have at least ten graduate students enrolled given that the course design, as it is currently set up, relies heavily on student participation and discussion.  The topic should be of broad interests to students in ecology as well as evolution, especially students pursing research in systematics.

 

Topics in Paleoecology
W 1:00 to 2:00
Castetter 107
BIO 402/502, cross-listed in anthropology

Felisa A. Smith
Associate Professor, Biology

Sherry V. Nelson
Assistant Professor, Anthropology

This one credit course will explore primary literature in topics related to paleoecology.  The class will determine what topics will be discussed at the beginning of the semester.  Potential topics include vertebrate paleontology, mass extinctions, macroecology, and climate change, and we encourage students to come to the class with more ideas.  We hope to bring in guest instructors from the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences and the New mexico Museum of Natural History.  Please join us!

 

Fall 2007

Computer Programming Fundamentals for Biologists
M W 1:00 - 1:50 pm/ Lab W 9:00 - 11:00 am
Room TBA
CS 151-010
Melanie Moses
Assistant Professor, Computer Science

This is a special section of CS 151, section 10, where the programming assignments will all be related to biology. This will be a hands on course, with lots of time in lab to ask questions and get comfortable with programming in Matlab. In addition to programming, we'll learn about different ways computers have changed how biologists analyze data and think about science. This is a course on programming and computation, not mathematics, and there are no math prerequisites.

 

Introductory Mathematical Biology
M W 11:00 - 11:50 pm/ Lab (Tentatively) M 13:00 - 15:00 am
Room TBA
BIO 402/502 (Firefox may not function properly)
Eric Toolson
Professor, Biology

This course is designed as a broad introduction to the theory and practice of mathematical biology. The course gives students the techniques and tools they need to utilize contemporary mathematical biology research literature in the context of their own particular academic interests.  The lecture portion of the course commences with an introduction to general principles of model construction and analysis, followed by a presentation of linear and nonlinear difference equation-based models of biological systems, then progresses to models involving linear and nonlinear ordinary differential equations.  Models are chosen for their broad applicability across levels of biological organization from gene regulation, metabolism and neuron function, to population and community dynamics.  Emphasis is placed on qualitative and numerical solution methods, and on highlighting commonalities in the mathematics used to model seemingly disparate systems.

    The lab portion of the course is devoted to providing students with a good working knowledge of MATLAB as a programming and simulation tool.  This will be facilitated through students' use of MATLAB to work with the models discussed in lecture as well as other models drawn from the mathematical biology literature.

 
   
   
         
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