The Program in Interdisciplinary Biological and Biomedical Science is a cross-departmental, college and institutional collaboration of students and faculty interested in interdisciplinary biological research.

Staff and Resources

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Nathan Holscher, Program Manager

From 2006-2011, Nathan served as
Director of Programs for Rivers Unlimited, a river protection organization in Ohio. Nathan brings considerable experience managing publicly and privately-funded grant programs that involve far-reaching partnerships with the non-profit, governmental and academic communities. While the majority of his experience in biology stems from directing a water quality monitoring program in partnership with the University of Cincinnati, he is interested in a variety of issues related to conservation and human health.

Contact Nathan:

holscher@unm.edu

(505)277-3021

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John Hammond, Postdoctoral Mentor

John has a broad background in ecology and evolution, with specific training and expertise in phenotypic plasticity.  As a postdoctoral fellow at Pittsburgh, he carried out a large project examining phenotypic plasticity from a phylogenetic perspective in anurans (frogs and toads).  During his training, he has become skilled at ecotoxicology and has been exposed to disease and climate change research programs. 

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Marcus Hamilton, Afilliated Postdoctoral Fellow

Marcus is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Santa Fe Institute working with Luis Bettencourt and Geoffrey West on scaling theory in urban and economic systems, and previously was a Postdoctoral Fellow in PIBBS with Felisa Smith. He has a broad background in evolutionary anthropology, archaeology, theoretical ecology, and statistics. His research addresses the general mechanisms that have shaped human ecological and evolutionary dynamics in the past, present, and future at multiple scales, from life history theory and behavioral ecology, to population dynamics and the biogeography of human biocultural diversity. His research emphasizes theory building and data analysis in equal parts and combines aspects of the physical, life, and social sciences. He is interested both in basic questions of integrative anthropology and macroecology, but also in the applied role such approaches can play in understanding the potential trajectories of human societies into the future.

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